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Who we Serve

PRIDE, Inc. works with individuals who have suffered a severe traumatic brain injury as well as individuals who have diverse challenges and or disabilities. The people that we serve usually are challenged in at least 5 of the areas below. Most of our people have been in two or more institutional settings before become involved with us.

  1. Many of the people that we serve have had significant issues with impulsivity, anger management and verbally (and at times physically) aggressive behavior.
  2. As a result of severe damage to the pre-frontal and frontal lobe, the people we support have generally inappropriate and sometimes dangerous behaviors, poor judgment skills that put them in hazardous situations, limited motivation, minimal insight into their injury and are socially stigmatized.
  3. Many have more then one medical issue in accompaniment with their TBI, such as: epilepsy, diabetes, asthma, etc.
  4. Most have moderate to significant memory loss and usually are able to retain new memories for only a very brief period of time.
  5. A large number have a duel-diagnosis whether it be a mental illness combined with their TBI, alcohol abuse/TBI, or drug abuse and TBI.
  6. The greatest percentage of people we serve have mobility issues. Most are challenged with their fine motor coordination.
  7. Most are challenged with their fine motor skills.

 

Many of the people that we serve have had significant issues with impulsivity, anger management and verbally (and at times physically) aggressive behavior.  They are typically in need of some clear boundaries related to the redevelopment of social skills and with coping with the frustrations presented by living with the many impairments associated with TBI.  They require acceptance and tolerance for them to be able to move forward and to move beyond the issues holding them back.


As a result of severe damage to the pre-frontal and frontal lobe, the people we support have generally inappropriate and sometimes dangerous behaviors, poor judgment skills that put them in hazardous situations, limited motivation, minimal insight into their injury and are socially stigmatized.  As a result of the noted issues, they "stand out" and are doubly cursed by not always being aware of their social inadequacies.  Many have been or would return to prison or a psychiatric hospital/facility without a focused intervention to help them manage and cope with the new life they have been presented with after a traumatic brain injur


Many have more then one medical issue in accompaniment with their TBI, such as: epilepsy, diabetes, asthma, etc.  We work with some of the leading disease management programs in the country developing specialized programs dealing with each medical issue.


Most have moderate to significant memory loss and usually are able to retain new memories for only a very brief period of time.  They are unable to perform simple sequential tasks, take medications, become employed, recall medical advice or maintain the most simple aspect of Adult Daily Living Skills as a result of their this effect of their injury.  Further complications for many are that they tend to confabulate information, create memories to replace the ones they have lost, causing them to have many challenges in developing and maintaining relationships.


A large number have a duel-diagnosis whether it be a mental illness combined with their TBI, alcohol abuse/TBI, or drug abuse and TBI.  Many of our clients did not have these challenges prior to suffering their TBI but they have these co-occurring disorders as a result of poor judgment post-injury.

 
Almost everyone we serve has a challenge with speech, whether it be in formulating speech, word retrieval, reception and understanding of language or in communicating effectively in a more general sense.
 
The greatest percentage of people we serve have mobility issues, but are usually self-ambulatory, either mobilizing with total independence, utilizing a walker or in a wheelchair, but have the ability to propel themselves with moderate assistance. We have served folks who need assistance to mobilize in their wheelchair, but as our program is community based and most therapies are done in community settings, the ability to access it is important.
 
Most are challenged with their fine motor coordination and need to relearn how to use their hands and fingers to perform simple tasks.
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